• Sample Artist Statement for Japan Days

    Thank you, Olese!!

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    UnShinKai Jacket (20)

     

    Made in Japan with Atsushi's Sashiko Students, Directed by Keiko.

     

    •Materials: Cotton 100% Indigo Dye Fabric, Natural Dyed Sashiko Thread (Hand-Dyed by Keiko).

    •Artisans: Members of UnshinKai (Atsushi's Students in Japan)

    • Size:<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->Top: 140cm / Bottom: 66 cm / Height: 103 cm

     

    [Story]

     

    With the great success with UnShinKai Jacket (18), we decided to focus on "Stitcher's Choice" more.

    We thought, by appreaciting their decision, we can emphacize our primary concept more.

     

    "All Different, All Good"

    (when one respect the stories behind)

     

    The patterns are limited to only 2: Asano-ha and Kagome so that the difference would be more visible.

    Instead, we asked them to choose the color of thread to apply as they wish.

    Since sub-theme of this Jacket is Spring Sakura, we asked them to use several pink-ish Natural Dye Sashiko Thread.

    We had 18 stitchers collaborating this beautiful Jacket.

     

    Sashiko isn't past. There are so many rising Sashiko artisans who can stitch like this.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    UnShinKai Jacket (18)

     

    Made in Japan with Atsushi's Sashiko Students, Directed by Keiko.

     

    •Materials: Cotton 100% Indigo Dye Fabric, Natural Dyed Sashiko Thread (Hand-Dyed by Keiko).

    •Artisans: Members of UnshinKai (Atsushi's Students in Japan)

    • Size:<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}--><!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->Top: 148cm / Bottom: 70 cm / Height: 86 cm

     

    [Story]

     

    One of Atsushi's core message in Sashiko is "there is no such a thing as Right and Wrong in Sashiko".

    It means that "All of the Sashiko is good" - All different, all good, when they try to respect the stories behind.

     

    When one learns the "Kata (型)" - form of Sashiko

    the stitches would start representing who stitcher is or what stitcher thinks.

    All stitchers are unique, and they are all good.

    All stitches are slightly different, and therefore all good.

    No one has to stitch the "rice grain size stitches".

    We wanted to prove our belief, and the result is this Jacket.

     

    Asking rising artisans who learned "Kata - Form" from Atsushi,

    we combined numbers of their Sashiko stitching panels into one Jacket.

    This Jacket isn't made by one skilled Japanese Sashiko Artisan.

    This Jacket is a beautiful result of many different stitches from the rising Sashiko Artisans who live "today".

     

    Boro To Be Jacket (20)

    Made in Japan by Keiko Futatsuya, with layering Japanese Vintage Fabric

     

    •Materials: Vintage "Kofu" Fabrics, Natural Dyed Sashiko Thread (Hand-Dyed by Keiko), Other Sashiko threads.

    •Artisans: Keiko & her friends

    • Size:Top: 130cm / Bottom: 68 cm / Height: 103 cm

     

    [Story]

     

    "Boro" became a fancy word in today's trend.

    However, the Japanese people who had to stitch to make Boro probablly did not want to make Boro.

    We respect the Japanese people who made Boro.

    Altbhough some say that we cannot make "authentic Boro" any longer, we believe we can

    by imagining their stitching.

    We cannot make the "Boro" with few hundreds years of using it to be displayed in the museum,

    but we can start the life of Boro with listening (communicating) what fabric would want.

     

    I feel that people romanticize the word of "Boro" too much.

    Boro is one result of our ordinary stichery, Sashiko.

    Yes, Boro can be beautiful. However, we want them to learn the whole picture before twisting the culture.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    9 Traditional Pattern Jacket

    Made in Japan, by Keiko Futatsuya, featuring 9 Japanese geometric patterns

     

    •Materials: Indigo Dye Cotton Fabric, Sashiko Thread (Original White)

    •Artisans: Keiko & her friends

    • Size:Top:<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->Chest: 68 cm / Yuki: 90cm / Sode 65cm

     

    [Story]

     

    There are many geometric patterns we use in Sashiko.

    (There are no such a thing as "Sashiko Pattern" though).

     

    One of the reasons the Japanese used the geometric pattern for their original Sashiko is

    to make the fabric stronger efficiently.

    When one focuses on "how it looks", their stitching may end up with weaken the fabric.

     

    With collaborating 9 geometric patterns, we made a beautiful & durable Sashiko Jacket.

     

     

     

     

    Boro To Be Tapestory/Blanket (20)

    Made in Japan by Keiko Futatsuya, with layering Japanese Vintage Fabric

     

    •Materials: Vintage "Kofu" Fabrics, Natural Dyed Sashiko Thread (Hand-Dyed by Keiko), Other Sashiko threads.

    •Artisans: Keiko & her friends

    • Size:<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->157cm x 144cm

     

    [Story]

     

    The purpose of fabric varies: to protect, to warmth, to identify who we are.

    We consider "Boro" as the way to communicate to people via fabric.

    With patchworking & stitching through fabric, we imagine what the Japanese people would think

    while stitching many years ago.

     

    Boro isn't just a word for "recycling" the fabric.

    It is the word to share the signifiance of Japanese culture.

     

     

     

     

    Unshinkai Bags

    Made in Japan with Atsushi's Sashiko Students, Directed by Keiko.

     

    •Materials: Cotton 100% Indigo Dye Fabric, Natural Dyed Sashiko Thread (Hand-Dyed by Keiko).

    •Artisans: Members of UnshinKai (Atsushi's Students in Japan)

    • Size:<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}--><!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->24 cm x 30 cm

     

    [Story]

     

    All Different, All Good.

    Our primary concept applies to bags.

    Thanks to the help of rising artisans after taking Atsushi's Sashiko Class,

    we are proud of presenting these bags.

     

     

     

    Oshima & Sashiko Bag

    Made in Japan with Atsushi's Sashiko Students, Directed by Keiko.

     

    •Materials: Oshima Vintage Silk Fabric, Natural Dye Sashiko Thread

    •Artisans: Keiko & her friends

    • Size:<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}--><!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}--><!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->26 cm 26cm + Strap

     

    [Story]

     

    The common fabric for Sashiko is cotton. Silk wasn't used for Sashiko due to its value.

    However, it doesn't mean that we "cannot" use the silk.

    Since our goal is to bring a piece of "unused fabric" to the main stage again,

    we stitched on the vintage silk fabric, and made a bag for using.

     

    When we learn, we can expand the possibility of Sashiko.

     

     

    Sashiko Furoshiki

    Made in Japan with Atsushi's Sashiko Students, Directed by Keiko.

     

    •Materials: Cotton 100% Indigo Dye Fabric, White Sashiko Thread

    •Artisans: Keiko & her friends.

    • Size:<!--td {border: 1px solid #ccc;}br {mso-data-placement:same-cell;}-->104 cm x 104 cm

     

    [Story]

     

    Furoshiki (風呂敷) is a Japanese term for "Wrapping Cloth".

    The Japanese people used Furoshiki to carry items and protecting something important.

    Since the purpose of cloth was "heavily used", they stitched to make the fabric stronger.

    We followed this original concept, and make Furoshiki for not only displaying, but also for "using".

     

    *Since the purpose of this item is to be used in the ordinary days,

    if situation allows, please let the visiters touch the item.

    We hope that the visiters can enjoy the warmth of our hand-stitching.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Keiko & Atsushi Futatsuya

    Japanese Sashiko Artisans

    Keiko and Atsushi Futatusya is a duo of Sashiko artisan, mother (Keiko) and her son (Atsushi).

    They have been practicing Sashiko since Keiko married into a Sashiko family in Gifu.

    In 2013, Keiko started her own project, “Sashi.Co” in Japan to achieve her dreams in Sashiko,

    and Atsushi started his company, “Upcycle Stitches” in the US to help Keiko & to share the Sashiko Stories.

     

    The principle of their Sashiko is “to enjoy our (their) own Sashiko '' while saying “there is no such a thing as Right or Wrong Sashiko”.

    For them, Sashiko is more than just simple stitching, and they are proud of sharing the depth of the Japanese Sashiko with the cultural significance.

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